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Amana

While Amana® brand Heating and Air Conditioning are renowned as a superior line of commercial and residential HVAC products, the Amana® name itself has long been a revered symbol of American ingenuity when it comes to their venerable lines of commercial and residential appliances. It all began in 1934, when George Foerstner founded Amana Refrigerator Inc. in Amana, Iowa, and accepted a challenge from an Iowa City businessman to build a dependable beverage cooler. Amana Refrigerator Inc. successfully met that challenge and, two years later, the company introduced another innovative product that soon became indispensable for commercial establishments such as grocery stores and restaurants – the walk-in beverage cooler, also known as a cold storage locker.

BLOWER MOTOR RELAY

There are two main types of blower motors.
1. Single-speed units operate on an on/off switch. These motors operate at a consistent speed until the desired temperature is achieved.
2. Multi-speed models allow variable fan speeds, which can help alleviate cold spots and make other temperature adjustments. Variable speed motors are also more energy efficient; since they can control small temperature shifts, multi-speed units don’t use as much fuel to heat up larger spaces.
How to Identify a Failing Blower Motor Relay
In a blower motor, the relay supplies the power that allows the fans to circulate warmed air. Essentially an on/off switch, the blower motor relay’s reactions start and end the heating process in HVAC systems by controlling the flow of current between the power source and the motor.
Blower motor relays tend to wear out over time from the stress of constantly flicking back-and-forth.
These signs indicate a possible issue with the blower motor relay.
• When the blower motor does not respond at all, it may not be due to mechanical failure within the motor itself. Since the relay supplies the current that makes the motor move, a nonresponsive motor may be the result of a worn-out relay.
• The blower motor relay does more than channel electrical current. Relays are a vital protection against electrical surges. When the relay receives a jolt of strong current or simply cannot manage and distribute its load, it will send excess current into the fuse. This forces a shutdown which protects the entire system from electrical damage. Thus, blown fuses could be a sign of relay issues.
• Blower motor relays handle a large amount of current. Malfunctioning relays aren’t able to distribute their load properly. This can cause the relay to retain excess heat and become warm to the touch. If left unaddressed, the heat from a compromised relay can melt away the plastic casing and components around it. In extreme cases, the panel or fuse box can sustain damage as well.
A malfunctioning relay means the HVAC system can’t distribute the treated air until the problem is corrected.

BLOWER MOTORS

A blower motor is the component within a home’s HVAC system. The motor blows heated air through vents when the heating system is in use. Conversely, some blower motors blow cold air when the air conditioning system is in use. There are two main types of blower motors: single-speed motors and variable-speed motors.

CAPACITOR

An HVAC capacitor is a device that stores electrical charge and is used in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning units. There are two types of capacitors found in HVAC units: start capacitors and run capacitors. Some HVAC units will only have a run capacitor.

COMPRESSOR

THE BASICS OF THE COMPRESSOR
In a split air conditioning system—the standard central AC found in most homes—the compressor is located in the outdoor unit. Its job is to circulate the refrigerant necessary for heat exchange through the coils of the indoor and outdoor unit, and also to apply the energy to the refrigerant. When you think of the air conditioner requiring power to provide cooling, you’re thinking of the electricity sent to run the compressor. (Electricity also powers the fans, although they do not provide cooling on their own, and can operate in “fan-only” mode.)
A motor powers the compressor, which is itself constructed like a motor, with a cylinder and piston. The compressor compresses the gaseous refrigerant, and this raises the refrigerant’s temperature so that changes it into a high-pressure gas. The high pressure forces the refrigerant through a line that leads to the outdoor coil, where the refrigerant releases its heat and condenses into a liquid. The liquid refrigerant then continues its trip to the indoor unit, where the refrigerant evaporates into a gas again and absorbs the heat from inside your home. The refrigerant then returns to the compressor and the cycle starts again.
COMPRESSOR REPAIRS
The compressor undergoes a great deal of stress during a cooling season in South Carolina, and it will wear down the same way a motor will. Grime and dust contamination will also affect it, leading to it becoming stuck. This will stop the cooling cycle, and usually the compressor must be replaced. A malfunction in the compressor’s motor will also stop cooling. Compressors can develop leaks at their connectors, causing a loss of refrigerant. Any drop in refrigerant charge can lead to damage to the compressor.

CONDENSER FAN MOTOR

Both air source heat pumps and air source air conditioners have a condenser fan motor. For an air conditioner, the condenser fan motor is used to reject heat. For a heat pump, the condenser fan motor both rejects heats and pulls air into the condenser coil to absorb heat. There are times when the condenser fan motor will fail making a repair necessary.

CONTACTOR

The contactor is the part of the air conditioner that controls the flow of electricity into the unit. When you turn off your AC, the contactor goes up, blocking power. By the same token, every time you turn on the air conditioner, the contactor is lowered, allowing electricity to power the system. Once your home reaches the temperature set on the thermostat, the contactor goes up again.1. The condenser unit never shuts off
This could be a sign that the contactor has melted, leaving the air conditioner with no means to block electricity.
2. AC hums and won’t turn on
When you turn on the AC, you may hear the air conditioner humming, but it won’t fully power on.
3. AC makes a chattering noise
Another sign is a chattering sound coming from inside the air conditioning unit.
Is Your AC Contactor Failing?

DAIKIN

Daikin is the World’s No. 1 air conditioning company. Our products are sold in over 140 countries, including throughout North America. Since the early 1930’s, we’ve worked to realize a better environment and quality of life through providing heating and cooling solutions.

DRAFT INDUCER ASEMBLY

Furnace draft inducer assembly. The draft inducer motor draws air into the burner and exhausts it out the flue. If the draft inducer motor is defective, the furnace may not heat.

ELECTIC HEATERS

Electric heaters are common in many split Hvac systems where it doesn’t get so cold, and also apart of many heat pump systems, which they are often referred to as ’emergency heat’. Electric heaters typically cost more to run than heat pumps, but are necessary when temperatures get so cold outside that the heat pump may not be able to keep up with the temperature.

ELECTROCSTATIC AIR FILTERS

Your air conditioner gives you cool, clean and fresh indoor air during the hot summer days. Thanks to air filters. Air filters play an integral role in keeping the air in your home clean and healthy. Here are the different types of air filters to choose from.
Fiberglass Air Filters
Disposable, most affordable yet with the lowest straining ability of all the types are fiberglass air filters. They work better in protecting your air conditioning system than screening dust and pollutants in the air. If you are using this type of air filter, you might still be prone to respiratory problems.
Pleated filters
Made of polyester fabrics or cotton folds, pleated air filters are effective in filtering dust and other pollutants. Choose those with more pleats because they offer better filtering performance.
Washable Air Filters
Washable air filters cost bigger than disposable types but save you big time in the long run. They can be removed and cleaned, so you don’t need to constantly replace them. Read the manufacturer’s specs on how to maintain filters of this type. Make sure to schedule cleaning ahead of the time. Let it dry completely because using it dump will cause mold growth and bacteria buildup.
Electrostatic Air Filters
Electrostatic air filters use an electrostatic charge to magnet dust and airborne particles then prevent them from being distributed in your home. Some filters of this type are washable while there are also those that aren’t.
HEPA Filters
High-efficiency particulate air filters are best for people with allergies and prone to respiratory difficulties. They are effective in screening contaminants up to 99.97% — a reason why the US Department of Energy recommends this type.
UV Filters
This type of filter uses ultraviolet lights to kill bacteria and viruses in your home. Although less efficient in screening dust and other pollutants, they are good at combatting microorganisms which are also dangerous to your health.
The variation of air filters provides choices for home and business owners in terms of efficiency, health benefits, costs, and maintenance. Call an HVAC professional at A/C ADVICE OF SOUTH CAROLINA for suggestions as to which type of air filter fits your home and comfort needs.

Fiberglass Air Filters

Your air conditioner gives you cool, clean and fresh indoor air during the hot summer days. Thanks to air filters. Air filters play an integral role in keeping the air in your home clean and healthy. Here are the different types of air filters to choose from.
Fiberglass Air Filters
Disposable, most affordable yet with the lowest straining ability of all the types are fiberglass air filters. They work better in protecting your air conditioning system than screening dust and pollutants in the air. If you are using this type of air filter, you might still be prone to respiratory problems.
Pleated filters
Made of polyester fabrics or cotton folds, pleated air filters are effective in filtering dust and other pollutants. Choose those with more pleats because they offer better filtering performance.
Washable Air Filters
Washable air filters cost bigger than disposable types but save you big time in the long run. They can be removed and cleaned, so you don’t need to constantly replace them. Read the manufacturer’s specs on how to maintain filters of this type. Make sure to schedule cleaning ahead of the time. Let it dry completely because using it dump will cause mold growth and bacteria buildup.
Electrostatic Air Filters
Electrostatic air filters use an electrostatic charge to magnet dust and airborne particles then prevent them from being distributed in your home. Some filters of this type are washable while there are also those that aren’t.
HEPA Filters
High-efficiency particulate air filters are best for people with allergies and prone to respiratory difficulties. They are effective in screening contaminants up to 99.97% — a reason why the US Department of Energy recommends this type.
UV Filters
This type of filter uses ultraviolet lights to kill bacteria and viruses in your home. Although less efficient in screening dust and other pollutants, they are good at combatting microorganisms which are also dangerous to your health.
The variation of air filters provides choices for home and business owners in terms of efficiency, health benefits, costs, and maintenance. Call an HVAC professional at A/C ADVICE OF SOUTH CAROLINA for suggestions as to which type of air filter fits your home and comfort needs.

FLAME SENSOR

Furnace flame sensor. The flame sensor monitors the burner to detect whether or not a flame is present. If the flame sensor is defective, the furnace may not heat.

FURNACE CIRCUIT OR CONTROL BOARD

Furnaces use a circuit or control board to perform any number of activities from simply igniting your furnace to alerting you to problems within your unit. This “brain” within the furnace initiates and ends the heating operation, monitors the temperature and watches your furnace for signs of problems.
Types of Control Boards
For a basic furnace, your control board will drive the operation of your ignitor, gas valve and flame sensor. These “simple ignition controls” are most common on older, less efficient units.
Integrated furnace controls, common on many high-efficiency furnaces today, lead the operation of many more activities. These might include the workings of the furnace blowers, as well as the onboard diagnostic system that provides you with troubleshooting information.
Control Board Operation
Typically, your control board kicks on the furnace ignition system (either a spark generator, glow coil or pilot light) after receiving a single from your thermostat that the temperature is too low. Once your ignitor is running hot, the control board gets gas flowing through the burners where that is ignited to start heating your home. Your control board then oversees the furnace’s operation until it receives another signal from your thermostat that your home has reached the appropriate temperature.